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St. Dominic's Catholic Church
2390 Bush St., San Francisco, CA 94115, 415-567-7824, info@stdominics.org
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This Week

Our Pastor’s Corner, October 19, 2014, Twenty-ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time 

Last Monday, I enjoyed the culmination of Fleet Week with a tour of the USS America. Freshly commissioned on Saturday, the boat was abuzz with folks viewing the inner workings and cutting-edge technology of the newest addition to the fleet. Three aspects of the tour were memorable and parallel the Scripture readings we hear this weekend.

First, because the ship is on active duty and was set to depart, members of the crew along with their family and friends mingled among the tourists. Chatting with one of the crew who welcomed us amidships, it became clear to me that she was there not because she had chosen the assignment, but rather, she was chosen for duty based on her training and expertise. Her knowledge of the hybrid electric-propulsion systems that power the boat made her a logical choice for the assignment. In Thessalonians, St. Paul reminds us that we have been chosen by God to live the faith we profess. “We give thanks to God always for all of you, unceasingly calling to mind your work of faith and labor of love and endurance in hope, knowing how you were chosen.” We often imagine that our faith is simply a matter of our choosing and our faith journey is simply a matter of will. Yet, St. Paul makes it clear that, even before we choose to follow Christ, he has already called us. Like the young crew assigned to the USS America, our following Christ is a response to his initiative.

Second, as I entered the first deck, I was greeted by a large pictorial panel of officers who have charge of the ship. What struck me was the number of personnel who support the specific military functions. For example, there is a medical officer looking after the health of the crew, a chaplain who has care for souls, officers in charge of supplies, and various ancillary staff. At full compliment, the crew totals more than 3,000 officers, sailors and marines. The USS America is like a floating city. In the first reading, when God surprisingly chooses King Cyrus of Persia as a Messiah, he gives him the power to free the chosen people from the Babylonia Captivity. “Thus says the LORD to his anointed, Cyrus, whose right hand I grasp, I have called you by your name, giving you a title, though you knew me not. I am the LORD and there is no other, there is no God besides me.” In calling Cyrus “his anointed” or “his Christ,” God makes it clear that those whom He chooses are given the ability to carry out his will. Even though Cyrus is a pagan king without any knowledge of the God of Abraham, God initiates His plan through him. Here the old adage comes to mind, “God doesn’t call the qualified; he qualifies those whom he calls.” Like the crew of the USS America, God has called each of us at St. Dominic’s to carry out a unique and vital mission to bring God’s love into the world. At home, at work, in the marketplace, there is no daily context too trivial where we cannot somehow share the love of God with others. You cannot be God’s love the same way I can, and reciprocally, I cannot share God’s love as you are able. It takes a community to bring God’s love to life.

Third, I was interested to see how the crew interacted with each other. As I disembarked, a young sailor who boarded stopped to salute an officer. A tourist asked, “Why did you salute?” She said, “Because he is an officer,” pointing to the insignia on his shoulder. Whether they personally know each other or not, the insignia worn on their uniform reveals the rank and task of each individual. The insignia gives not only a sense of identity to the crew, but helps them to relate to one other for the good working of the entire boat. In the Gospel, Jesus gives the famous answer to those who ask whether or not one ought to pay tax. “Give to Caesar what belongs to Caesar and to God what belongs to God.” Because Caesar’s image is on the coin of the realm, he has a claim on it. Similarly, because we are made in the image and likeness of God, Christ answers that God has a claim on our very lives. Every goodness in our life comes from God, and our task is to return that goodness through the way we live and treat others. 

The USS America has launched its first mission to protect and serve. Here at St. Dominic’s, we launch a weekend of discernment of how we can give to God what is God’s: our minds and hearts. One practical way to give God your talents is to pick up our new ministry booklet published this weekend. In the booklet, you’ll discover a myriad of ways that you can help to make a difference in the life of the parish and community. The act of considering how we give to God what is God’s activates our faith and brings God’s love to life.

~ Fr. Michael Hurley, O.P.

Our Pastor’s Corner, October 26, 2014, Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Together we’re Giant. World Series fever has hit the City. Following their recent success in 2010 and 2012, the San Francisco Giants are once again knocking on the door of a world championship and the excitement is palpable. The City is decked out in orange and black, Giants’ flags adorn civic structures, and even novices who don’t know a touchdown from a home run are vaguely aware of the local team’s success. Though the outcome is still in the balance (as of this writing) two aspects of the Giants’ memorable run from the lowest wild card to World Series contender emerge. First, though the Giants don’t have the highest payroll or the biggest stars when compared to some other clubs, their success is built on their cohesion as a team. A sign of this is their marketing strategy. Instead of building a brand exclusively around individual stars such as Posey, Pence and the Panda, the Giants emphasize the importance of team. Their slogan from 2012 was “Together We’re Giant.” This core concept identifies true success as a function of everyone executing their particular roles. From Ishikawa to Bumgarner, every fresh victory brings a new hero. The team is greater than just collection of stars.

Second, flowing from this on-field cohesion, the “Together We’re Giant” slogan invites fans to consider that their rooting interest and support makes a difference toward ultimate victory. The implication is clear: the enthusiasm of those who follow the team is an integral part of being a champion. It is not just that the team’s success creates excitement, but rather the excitement for the team itself is a significant ingredient in the team’s success.

In today’s Gospel, Jesus sums up the entirety of the 613 Mosaic laws when He points to love of God and neighbor as the heart of His message. This core idea forms the Gospel “slogan” of Jesus’ preaching. One aspect of the Two Great Commandments is that there is relationship between our love of God and our love of neighbor. For example, those who say they love God but harbor bitterness and resentments towards others are liars. (1 John 4:20). Or again, if we say that we love God and yet do not respond to the need around us, then Jesus will hold us responsible “Whatever you do to the least, you do it to me.” (Matt. 25:40) By making love the measure of faithfulness, Jesus gives us our mission: to be Christ to one another. When we put love into action, we are Christ for others.

Last week, we celebrated the feast of St. Theresa of Avila, the Spanish mystic and Doctor of the Church who reformed the Carmelites. The spiritual insights in her biography and writings are rich with reflection on the power of love in our lives. A popular poem attributed to her is a favorite of mine.

Christ has no body but yours,
No hands, no feet on earth but yours,
Yours are the eyes with which he looks with compassion on this world,
Yours are the feet with which he walks to do good,
Yours are the hands, with which he blesses all the world.
Yours are the hands, yours are the feet,
Yours are the eyes, you are his body.

Win or lose, the Giants have brought buzz. For players and fans alike, there is a sense that we’re in it together. Today Christ invites us to consider how the way we love each other brings us together as a community of faith. We may not think of ourselves as “supersaints” or perform extraordinary miracles, but when our daily actions reflect the love of God to one another, Together We’re Jesus.

~ Fr. Michael Hurley, O.P.

Upcoming Events
Monday, October 20
Until 10/28
 
St. Jude Novena

St. Jude Novena, Monday, Oct. 20 – Tuesday, Oct. 28

Masses Weekdays: 8:00 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Sunday: 11:30 a.m. 
Rosary preceding all Masses; Blessing with relic after weekday Masses.

Fr. Kieran Healy, O.P., Pastor of St. Mary Magdalene Church in Berkeley, will preach. Fr. Healy wi...

(more)
Saturday, October 25
9:15-1:00 PM
 
St. Jude Pilgrimage (eight-mile walk)
Transportation from St. Dominic's parking lot available from 6:30 am - 8:30 am. The walk starts at Our Lady of Perpetual Help, 60 Wellington Ave, Daily City.
1:30-3:00 PM
 
St. Jude Pilgrimage Mass
Bilingual Solemn Mass with Bishop William Justice, Auxilary of San Francisco
Wednesday, October 29
5:30-9:30 PM
 
St Anthony of Padua Relic
St Anthony Relic, Wednesday, October 29, Masses with Veneration at 5:30 p.m. & 7:30 p.m. St. Anthony will visit us in the form of a precious relic from his Basilica in Padua, Italy. This relic will be accompanied by Fr Mario Conte, a Franciscan Friar from Padua where the Saint is buried. Accordi...(more)
Thursday, October 30
7:30-9:30 PM
 
"The Life and Theology of St. Thomas Aquinas"
"The Life and Theology of St. Thomas Aquinas" presented by Fr. Michael Hurley and Fr. Justin Gable.  This 6-week series starts October 16th through November 20th, 7:00 p.m. in the Parish Hall.
Sunday, November 02
11:30-1:10 PM
 
All Souls' Day Requiem Mass - Mozart Requiem
A special Requiem Mass on All Souls' Day, featuring Mozart's powerful Requiem Mass.
St. Dominic's Schola Cantorum, The San Francisco Choral Artists, The Festival Orchestra.
Memorial forms are available from the church or Parish Office.
Thursday, November 06
7:30-9:30 PM
 
"The Life and Theology of St. Thomas Aquinas"
"The Life and Theology of St. Thomas Aquinas" presented by Fr. Michael Hurley and Fr. Justin Gable.  This 6-week series starts October 16th through November 20th, 7:00 p.m. in the Parish Hall.
7:30-9:00 PM
 
Natural Family Planning - Intro Class
Attend an Introductory Natural Family Planning class. Thursday, Nov. 6, 7:30 p.m., Aquinas Room. Deacon Bill Turrentine and Pat Turrentine, volunteers with the Couple to Couple League, offer an overview of NFP - what it is and why it is important. Engaged or married couples are welcome. To register ...(more)
Tuesday, November 11
7:30-9:00 PM
 
Marriage Class I: Intro to Marriage Preparation Process
St. Dominic's offers classes for engaged couples preparing for the Sacrament of Marriage.

 

Marriage Preparation Class I: A School for Intimacy, second Tuesday of the month, 7:30 p.m., Aquinas Room.

 

No sign-up is required for the class.

Wednesday, November 12
7:30-9:00 PM
 
Marriage Prep Class II: Must-Have Conversations
St. Dominic's offers classes to engaged couples as part of the preparation for the Sacrament of Marriage.

Class II: Life-Giving Marriages, second Wednesday of the month, 7:30 p.m. in the Siena room

No sign-up is required for the class.
Monday, November 17
7:30-8:30 PM
 
Baptismal Preparation
Third Monday of the month (except holidays), 7:30 p.m., Aquinas Room.

Registered parishioners are invited to have their children baptized at St. Dominic’s. Parents and Godparents must participate in our Baptismal Preparation Classes. Both parents and at least one of the godparents must attend...(more)

Featured Links

For families and youth: Family and Children's Faith Formation
For adults interested in becoming Catholic and for Catholics seeking confirmation: RCIA
For adults in their 20s & 30s: Young Adults Group
For returning Catholics: Landings
For music lovers: Choir Ministries
MCs, Lectors, and EMs: Liturgical Ministers Schedule

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Sunday's Homily
Fr. Michael Hurley, O.P.
October 19, 2014

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Mass Schedule
Sunday
5:30 p.m. - Saturday Vigil
7:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. - Family
11:30 a.m. - Choir
1:30 p.m. - En EspaƱol
5:30 p.m. - Contemporary
9:00 p.m. - Candlelight

Weekdays
6:30 a.m.
8:00 a.m.
5:30 p.m. - St. Jude Mass

Saturday
7:40 a.m. - Rosary
8:00 a.m. - Mass with Morning Prayer

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Parish Office
Phone: 415-567-7824
Fax: 415-567-1608

Office Hours
Sunday: 9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Closed Monday.
Tuesday through Friday:
9:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Saturday: 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Recent Documents
Pastor's Corner: Previous versions
Parish bulletin: October 19, 2014 Leadership report: May 12, 2013 Newsletter: October 15, 2014

Useful Resources
Pray as You Go provides daily prayer for your MP3 player
Daily readings and Psalms from the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops
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