2390 Bush St
San Francisco, CA 94115
(415) 567-7824

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Preservation and Restoration

With the seismic retrofit of St. Dominic's Church having been accomplished in 1992, the focus of the parish has shifted to restoration of its exterior and interior walls and roof, to preservation of its neo-Gothic interior graced by stained glass, wood carving, and marble statuary, and to restoration of its historic Woodberry organ. Here within the splendor, St. Dominic's cherished liturgies take place, and its soul is found. The conviction that this church is more than stone, wood, steel and concrete is what drives parishioners to preserve its treasures with the same zeal they brought to the retrofit program of the late eighties-early nineties. Photo

North Transept - Outside Wall
Failure in the Masonry
Photo: Lucia Dugliss

South Transept--Bl. Imelda Lambertini Altar
Water Damage in Blue Ceiling
& Surrounding Walls
Photo: Lucia Dugliss

Walls and Roof

Season upon season of increasingly inclement weather has subjected the church walls and roof to onslaughts that have badly worn down their defenses. Water pours into the church during the rainy season, rendering areas of the nave off limits. Studies conclude that the walls require complete re-pointing and re-glazing.

Stained glass windows

The stained glass windows of St. Dominic's were made by Charles J. Connick of Boston, Max Ingrand of Paris, and the Cummings Studios of San Francisco. They are precious, irreplaceable works of art. There are thirty-six in all. Some as tall as thirty feet. They are cherished for their beauty and high narrative content. Studies have revealed that the windows need to be re-leaded and mullioned.

South Transept--Interior Wall
Water Damage
Photo: Lucia Dugliss

Interior Wall
Water Damage
Photo: Lucia Dugliss

The Organ
As the stained glass windows are a treasured part of the church's historical legacy, so is the St. Dominic's organ. Built in 1909 by Jesse Woodberry & Company of Boston and installed in the current church in 1928, the organ, with its complement of 5,400 pipes, is registered with the Organ Historical Society. As one of the grand examples of Jesse Woodberry's work, it has served St. Dominic's honorably for nearly one hundred years as befits an instrument of its pedigree. But the years have taken their toll, and although the organ survived the 1989 earthquake, it is in dire need of restoration. Its rehabilitation is expected to take two years.

Strengthen this House and Continue this Tradition.

We welcome contributions to the preservation of these treasures. Call or write to St. Dominic's Church, 2390 Bush Street, San Francisco 94115; tel (415) 567-7824. You may also contribute by Visa or MasterCard.